This page is fully or partially automatically translated.

myBeviale.com Header Craft Beverage & brau@home Stage
  • Lecture
  • Craft Beverage and brau at home Stage
  • Raw Materials and Sensory Refinement
  • Services, Institutes, Training Institutions and Media

The Origins of Dark Lagers: A Surprisingly Gripping Detective Story

Horst Dornbusch reports on exciting, groundbreaking detective work and unexpected discoveries.

11/11/2020 3:15:00 PM – 11/11/2020 4:00:00 PM

Please log in or register in advance so that you can take part in actions or watch videos about the action!

This action is available to the it-sa 365 community as a video.

myBeviale.com Header Craft Beverage & brau@home Stage
  • Lecture
  • Craft Beverage and brau at home Stage

Horst Dornbusch reports on exciting, groundbreaking detective work and unexpected discoveries.

Language: German

Questions and Answers: Yes

graphical blue background
close

This video is available to the myBeviale.com community. Please register or log in with your login data.

Action description

As everybody knows, dark lagers originate in Bavaria and are currently part of portfolio of many breweries. In addition, some nine out of ten beers around the world are now brewed with bottom fermenting yeast.

But that hasn't always been the case. Up until the early Middle Ages, all beers brewed anywhere were probably pale; and, prior to the late Renaissance, bottom-fermented beers didn't exist at all!

But here is another surprise: We also know today that half the genes of S. pastorianus are an exact copy of the genes of the top-fermenting yeast S. cerevisiae, a resident of Bavaria since time immemorial, while the other half is identical to the genes of S. eubayanus, a wild yeast that was discovered only in 2011, in Patagonia, in the high Andes of South America.
This raises the question: How did the two distant yeasts come together in Bavaria in the 16th century to create S. pastorianus as a hybrid, at a time, when there had not been any contact between Central Europe and Patagonia?

Horst Dornbusch and Thomas Kraus-Weyermann tried to unpack this mystery of the origin of dark lager beers in a recently published book. Horst Dornbusch reports on the exciting and seminal detective work by the two authors; and on the unexpected discoveries they made in the process. It turns out that, without a unique set of circumstances involving an interplay of climatological, meteorological, political and microbiological factors taken place exactly in Bavaria and precisely at that time, there would be no bottom-fermented beers today!

read more

Speaker